Marking Revolutionary War Patriots' Graves

Serving the Piedmont - Culpeper, Fauquier, Madison, Orange and Rappahannock Counties

Recently the chapter has placed SAR markers on the soldiers and patriots graves as listed below. We desire information on all Revolutionary War soldiers and patriots who have a record of burial in the counties we serve (see above). If you know of any, please contact our Graves Registration Chairman. If you are a direct descendant, we will schedule a grave marking and invite you and your family to attend the marking ceremony. We generally are able to mark one or two graves per year. If the soldier does not have a gravestone we will assist you in obtaining one from the Veteran's Administration.

The purposes and objectives of the National Society, Sons of the American Revolution are declared to be patriotic, historical, and educational, and shall include those intended or designed to perpetuate the memory of the men who, by their services or sacrifices during the war of the American Revolution, achieved the independence of the American people.

 

May 2005: 10:30 am:
Captain Francis Hume Revolutionary War Grave Marking Ceremony, Business Routes U.S. 29/15 business route southwest of Remington, Va. CMM President Jerry Hubbard Presided, CMM Color Guards Dominic & Francis Lay (twins) posted the colors at Capt. Hume’s grave marker. (Jim Bayne was there in his color guard uniform to give support. 2nd Vice President Al White led the Pledge of Allegiance and past president Rick Schnorf led the SAR Pledge. Treasurer Thad Hartman gave the welcome and recognized the special guests that included the decendants of Capt. Hume present at the ceremony: Mrs Francis Birge, Tommy and Sally Birge, their daughter Lisa Birge and her stepson John Darby. Also Susan Hume McIntosh and husband Dennis. Also Ann Hume Loikow and her husband John. CMM members and their spouses attending were Jerry Hubbard, Dominic Lay, Francis Lay, Jim Bayne, Mike and Marty Lyman, Mel and Myrtle Helmik, Al and Anna Rae White, Rick and Midge Schnorf, Larry & Beverly Alexander, Dr. John Sinks, and Paul and Monica Bess. Thad Hartman, Graves Registration Chairman, unveiled the SAR Grave Marker. Compatriot Mel Helmik told the story of researching the records of Spottsylvania, Orange, and Culpeper Counties to certify the location of Capt. Hume’s grave, and also of his service to his country during the Revolutionary War. Thad Hartman dedicated the placing of the SAR Grave marker and Jerry Hubbard placed the CMM Chapter Memorial wreath at the grave marker. Four members of the American Legion Post 300 Rifle Team(to be named later at the Blue Star Ceremony) presented a three volley gun salute. Ryan Colonder of Stonewall Jackson High School, Prince William County then played a moving rendition of TAPS. Ryan’s parents Dean C. and Mary Jo Colonder were present. A grand total of 33 persons attended the ceremony, not including the county police deputies and the photographers.
 

          

    

    

    

May 18, 2002: The Culpeper Minute Men Chapter, Virginia Society, Sons of the American Revolution conducted a grave marking ceremony honoring Private Martin Fishback who served in the American Revolution. Martin Fishback was born in 1762 in northern Culpeper County at what is now known as "Fleetwood" in Jeffersonton. At the conclusion of the Revolutionary War (RW), Martin returned to his home and married Lucy Amiss at the homestead in 1783 and lived out his life there. He died in 1844 in the same room in which he was born. Among the battles in which Martin served was the Battle of Yorktown, which was the culmination of the war and determined American independence from England.

The current owners of "Fleetwood", Mr. Bill Cox and Mrs. Anne Cox have taken great care to restore the home to an appearance much as it was in bygone years. They have also worked quite diligently to restore the cemetery, which is adjacent to the home. They addressed the gathering and gave details about the house and the Martin Fishback family. Historian, O.H. Perry Cabot, gave details about the cemetery, which contains many graves from the late 1700s and early 1800s including that of John Spillman, a patriot of the RW. As a part of the ceremony Mrs. Sally Spillman Tufts and CMM President Mike Lyman placed a wreath at the grave of Patriot John Spillman. It is thought the cemetery contains the grave of at least one other soldier from the RW. RW flags were presented to the families of descendents of Martin Fishback at the conclusion of the ceremonies. In addition Mrs. Connie Anthony, a direct descendent, and her husband Mr. Jack Anthony, a member of the Culpeper Minute Men, presented Mr. and Mrs. Cox with a history/genealogy which had been published by her grandfather a number of years ago. They also presented the Coxes with a framed photograph of "Fleetwood" which was taken in the early 1900s.

In attendance at the ceremony were forty two people including eight direct descendants of Martin Fishback and one descendant of his father, John Frederick Fishback. Very special guests were Revolutionary War General George Weedon and his wife Catherine as portrayed by Skip and Diane Nolan of Fredericksburg, VA. General Weedon commanded militia from this area during the war and may very well have been Private Martin Fishback's commanding officer at some point during the conflict. Also attending were Mr. & Mrs. Brad Rosenberg and family. "Fleetwood" was owned by the Rosenberg family for some six generations. Representing the Sons of the American Revolution were Dr. Trice Taylor, President of the Virginia Society; Mr. William Simpson, past President of the Colonel Fielding Lewis Chapter and graves registration chairman for the Virginia Society; Mike Lyman, President of the Culpeper Minute Men and his wife Marty; the Virginia Society Color Guard represented by Andy Johnson of the George Mason chapter from Arlington, VA who carried the flag of the United States of America; John Cabaniss of the Thomas Nelson, Jr. Chapter from Newport News, VA who carried the flag of the Commonwealth of Virginia; and Jim Bayne of the Culpeper Minute Men chapter from Culpeper who carried the colors of the Culpeper Minute Men.
 
Honors were provided by American Legion Post #330 rifle squad represented by Squad commander Jerry Black and members Roy Hamon, Wayne English, and Gerald Newman. TAPs was rendered by Mr. Mark Farkus of Amissville. A delightful part of the observance was a hosted tour by the Cox family following the ceremony of their 1730's "Fleetwood" home.

CAPTAIN ANGUS RUCKER, Wolftown, Va.

On May 19th 2001, at Wolftown, VA in Madison County, our Chapter conducted a grave marking ceremony for Captain Angus Rucker. Supporting the ceremony were a four man American Legion Firing Party (One member was our Vice President Jim Bayne), a Boy Scout Bugler who played TAPS, three Boy Scout color guards, and a Scoutmaster who played the bagpipes. What a great job they all did! Our appreciation goes out to them.

Attending, besides our SAR Chapter members and their wives, were a direct descendant of Captain Rucker and her husband, another Rucker family, the President of the Rucker Family Society and her husband, the property owner, a member of the Montpelier Chapter NSDAR, and a member of the Madison County Historical Society.
PHOTO ABOVE: Grave Marking ceremony being conducted by SAR Chapter President Mike Lyman. BELOW LEFT: A Cub Scout, two Boy Scouts and the Scoutmaster post and retire the colors at the ceremony. BELOW RIGHT: A 13 Star American flag is presented by SAR Chapter President Mike Lyman to Charlotte Beaulieu, a direct descendant of Captain Angus Rucker. The photo also shows part of the flat gravestone of Captain Rucker, the SAR Chapter wreath and grave marker and a monument erected by the Montpelier Chapter NSDAR in 1976.

The attendance, including supporters, totaled 24 people. Several of the guests participated in the ceremony by presenting facts they had obtained about Captain Rucker and his family. The SAR grave marker and a chapter wreath, made by Melba Bayne, were unveiled during the ceremony. A 13 star American flag was presented to the descendant.
PHOTO BELOW: Shown is The American Legion Post 330 Firing Party and a Boy Scout Bugler playing TAPS as part of the ceremony.

COLONEL ROBERT RANDOLPH, Eastern View Cemetery in Midland, Va.

The CMM SAR Chapter placed an SAR grave marker next to his gravestone in Eastern View Cemetery in Midland, VA on May 20th 2000 as part of a Commemoration Service. Two direct descendants attended the ceremony and were presented US Flags. His gravestone is inscribed: "Col Robert Randolph of Eastern View, son of Peter Randolph of Chatsworth 1760-1825 Elizabeth Carter his wife, daughter of Charles Carter of Shirley 1764-1832." He served as a Cornet in the 3rd Continental Dragoons, in February 1777, and commissioned Lieutenant on 14 June 1777. He was wounded and taken prisoner at Tappan, 28 Sep 1778. Later after his release he served as Captain for 3 years in the VA Calvary. He received 4000 acres as a pension bounty warrent on 13 June 1783 His mother was the daughter of Robert and Anne(Cocke) Bolling. His son Charles served in the War of 1812.


Some of the attendees at the Col. Robert Randolph grave marking ceremony.

JOHN DeBAPTIST, Falmouth Union Church Cemetery, Falmouth, Va.

John DeBaptist served as a sailor on the ship Dragon of the Virginia Navy. The Dragon was launched at Fredericksburg, VA in October 1777, and mainly cruised the Rappahanock River, but was in a battle with a British ship in the Chesapeake Bay. John DeBaptist was a free black from the Island of St. Kitts. He owned and operated the ferry at Falmouth, VA until he died. He apparently owned quite a lot of property at his death. This is reflected in the fine quality of his tombstone.

JAMES HUNTER, Falmouth Union Church Cemetery, Falmouth, Va.

James Hunter was the owner and operator of the Hunter Iron Works at Falmouth, which provided the overwhelming majority of muskets and iron cooking implements for the Virginia troops in the Revolutionary War. He produced: muskets, rifles, bayonets, swords, pistols, and large-bore wall guns. For the Virginia Navy he produced: anchors and ship fittings. He outfitted the Virginia troops who played a vital role in the Battle of Cowpens, and also those who were at Yorktown. Hunter's Iron Works were so valuable that Governor Thomas Jefferson ordered special military protection for the industry. Hunter was never adequately paid for his services and he suffered serious financial setbacks as a result. James Hunter sacrificed his fortune for the cause of independence and is considered a true patriot.

LT. COLONEL JOHN JAMESON, Culpeper Masonic Cemetery, Culpeper, Va.

The CMM SAR Chapter placed an SAR marker on next to his gravestone in the Culpeper Masonic Cemetery in Culpeper, VA on October 16, 1999 as part of a Commemoration Service for he and his brother David. He was a captain and company commander in the original Culpeper Minute Men Batttalion when it was formed in September 1775. He fought in the first Revolutionary War battle in Virginia at Great Bridge. In June 1776 he was in the 3rd troop of horse. In March 1777 he served as Major in the Continental Dragoons. In June 1778 he was wounded at Valley Forge, PA. In August 1780 while stationed near New York his unit captured the British spy John Andre, who was relaying a message from Benedict Arnold betraying the American cause. He married Elizabeth Starrow (or Davenport). He was born in 1751 and died 20 Nov 1810. He was buried first in the Cedar grove Cemetery in Culpeper.

LIEUTENANT DAVID JAMESON, Culpeper Masonic Cemetery, Culpeper, Va.

He was the "Standard Bearer" for the original Culpeper Minute Men Battalion and carried the "coiled snake" flag when the county milita was formed in April 1775. In 1780 he was commissioned as a Lieutenant in General Steven's Brigade while serving an 18 month tour in the southern states. He was later called Colonel on the County Militia. In 1790 he was a delegate to the Virginia Legislature. He also served as Magistrate in the county and twice attained the office of high sheriff. He died at his home at "Redwood" in Culpeper on October 2, 1831 at the age of 88. He married Mary Mennis who died in 1802.

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